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washington to proclaim the protesters vandals. this about 50 # -- 50 # minutes. >> there is nothing so easy but to persuade people they are badly governed. those words were spoken by the brilliant 18th century massachusetts governor thomas hutchenson, and i'll tell you more about him later. let me tell you what else he said because the words hold true today as much as they did then in 1774. governor hutchenson said you can take the happiest and most comfortable people and use malicious, rhetorical skills to arouse popular discontent with their government, with their rulers, with everything around them, even themselves. this is one of the weaknesses, he said, these are his words "one of the weaknesses of human nature of which ambitious politicians make you to serve their purposes." i year before he uttered those words, a group of boston rebel rowsers convinced americans they were miserable, and to quote hitchenson again, "those who think they are misrabble are so despite real evidence to the contrary." now, i doubt if there's a single one of today's tea party patriots who knew what the origi
. it was a couple of days' ride from monticello to washington. he stopped at an inn and falls into a conversation with a fellow guest and they have a lovely, wide ranging discussion the next morning the other guest mr. jefferson is up and out and the other guest had never called his name and he said to the inn keeper who was that and he said who did you think it was? for a while and you knew so much about medicine i thought he was a doctor. then we talked about theology and he seemed as though he might be a priest though a shaky one. i thought he could have been certainly a farmer because of everything he knew and he said i thought you knew mr. jefferson. he was a master of so many different worlds and he was indefinitely curious at the time when human curiosity and the ability to lead us to our own destiny to fulfil in many ways our greatest potentials to discover, to explore was new in the world and this was the enlightened era. they had been a day before yesterday. for the first time ever, priestley and princely authority was in the dhaka, and jefferson was there to reap the harvest of the shi
let's close tonight with some advice from one of you to washington. >> my message to all of washington for the new year is to set partisanship aside working on behalf of 100% of the voters, fix this mess you've gotten us into, bring a balanced budget to the table to grow this economy for the long term not the short term. >> there you go. for the long term, not the short term. >> there you go. i'm don lemon. happy new year to you. jooirksz . >>> hello, i'm don lemon and this is cnn's top 10 of 2012. we look at the stories that captured our attention, what we see as the biggest stories of the year around the world, in crime, money, weather and even the biggestscandals and later this hour, those stories chosen by you. anchor of state of the union, candy crowley, with the top ten political stories of 2012. >>> like finding your favorite grain of sand on the beach. impossible number of possibilities. catch phrases become boomerangs. >> if you got a business you didn't build that. >> i like being aable to find service members. >> i'm an american woman who uses contraception. let's start ther
'm not going to say it. >> you are in our hearts. you can tell us what's going on in washington. what's going on in washington? >> bad dynamics. >> really? >> those of us optimistic there'd be a deal. the white house has blasted boehner's offer as much as the republicans blasted the president's. people like to say, oh, they're going to posture, but behind the scenes they're working it out. they're not. >> i hear chuck todd reported yesterday behind the scenes a top aide to barack obama, willie geist. and this -- i don't -- i'm not really good at reading the tea leaves. maybe this is good, maybe this is bad. but a top obama aide yesterday told chuck todd that if the republicans -- if these republicans were in power when abraham lincoln were there, there would still be slavery. does that help the process move along? or does it hurt? i don't really know -- >> reading between the lines. >> i know one direction, i know boy bands. >> reading between the lines, that's probably a bad omen. we do have four weeks, though. >> that's bad. >> absolutely. we have, i believe, we have 27 negotiating days. un
are presenting that we can either contact or -- ? >> yes, peter bareez -- peter de vries of washington state and tom harkin in the senate. i have just come to our door tom harkin because he is like a voice of rationality in understanding the economics and burnie of the legal rules -- and making sure we have liberals for the economy. and the transaction tax is being taken very seriously in europe and probably will happen there, even though the u.k. is kicking and screaming because they specialize in being the home of trading, whether trading in stocks or derivatives or anything else. they simply do not want that to be taxed. there are people in congress. i think wall street is now the number-one contributor to political campaigns. at least, it is in the running for number-one. i have been to washington many times and i'm involved with several groups that are trying to reform the business sector so that it can work, so that it can survive. it is very difficult because of the sheer amount of money that the finance sector in particular is pouring into lobbying and campaign contributions. it is v
understanding. yeah, right. not in washington. >> i won't play that game. >> we can't negotiate with ourselves. >> it is me. >> number three, bob costas. did he cross the line? number five, the most outrageous royal prank ever. >> hello there. could i please speak to kate please, my granddaughter? >> this is piers morgan tonight. good evening. our big story tonight from what every one is talking about. washington's high-stakes game of "let's make a deal," to the royal prank called heard around the world. to bob costas talking about guns. and this shocking new york subway photograph. reports of chemical weapons in syria. let's get started with what promises to be a lively discussion. abbe huntsman, and a host of huff posts live. and welcome to you all. let's start with guns and the fallout of the murder and suicide of jovan bellcher and his girlfriend. bob costas of nbc spoke out about this. let's watch what he said tonight. >> i believe that there should be more comprehensive and effective controls on the sale of guns. roughly 40% of the guns purchased in this country do not require a backgrou
in and year out that washington doesn't get deals done. you are thinking what is wrong with american politicians? why can't they get around the table and negotiate properly? >> nobody cares about the future of america. here we have america urging the israe israelis to negotiate except us in washington. our parties are so extreme. >> i think the moral is set so low right now on both sides. the country is so divided. we are the one that is are going to be handed down the $16 trillion deficit. it is hard for this to play out. they will come to some sort of a deal. you are going to see them come to a deal. you are going to see them with something sort of like the simpson bowles. >> pam has sent it to the public. that if it goes over the fiscal cliff republicans are prepared to make the middle class pay more tax paying more. and that is a very bad position for the republicans to find themselves in isn't it? >> sit a very bad position for them to find themselves in. the fact of the matter is, it isn't true. the taxes on the wealthiest americans, it doesn't address the core problems. the $1
't an impersonator, it was the senator asking me to come to washington to talk to him about doing a biography of his father. i went to washington and the senator and i and his two dogs have lunch together on monday since the dogs came to the senate with him because the senate wasn't in session and they could of rome and play. was a weird sight, believe me. we were brought into the tiny little conference room, the two dogs, the senator and me with a card table in the middle, and the senator who was always on a diet. he would feel better the center he was head the biggest sand which i'd ever seen like a sliver of tuna fish that looked as old as he was and on a piece of bread. i had two pieces of bread and potato chips and we talked for three or four hours. and what i remember saying over and over and over again is you don't want me to write this book because i am a historian, and i went find stuff, and whenever i find i'm going to put in the book and who knows, by the time this book comes out there might be a kennedy running for office. little did i know that that kennedy's naim what the joseph p. ken
to be for the rising movie industry. cet will head out to washington as president obama is pushing forward his tax for the wealthy agenda. george osbourne is going to update today. the chancellor will have his work cut out to meet his target of eradicating the federal deficit by 2015 as well as securing a fall to gdp ratio. also expected further pressure with a cut to its growth forecast. steve is braving rather inclement british winter weather outside the houses of parliament. >> lovely. >> i know you like it. how much is it going to be raining on george osbourne's parade? >> it's going to rain on his parade. you just nailed it, ross. three things which are going to come up today, which he has very little control over. one is that obr reckoning on the uk economy. thought only back in march it was going to grow -- pain a negative growth for the year. next year they thought it was going to be 2% growth. it's probably only going to be 1%. in terms of those two targets you mentioned, eradicating the structural deficit in a five-year period, that's going to have another couple of years. >> right. now,
. >> in washington, msnbc and "time" senior political analyst, mark halperin. >> we saw him on the streets of d.c. yesterday, and he was very cagey. >> the mean streets of d.c. >> yes. he was so cagey. >> he was. >> yes. yes. >> you can't ever ask those guys what they're doing, wherever they are. where you going? with who? a meeting. >> auditioning for a gang is what i'm doing. >> right. >> yes, exactly. lots of luck with that one. >> should we get to the news? >> fantastic. boy, there's some stories here, unbelievable. >> in the least. >> you talk about libya. i tell you what, you've got assad about to cross that red line. he's going to see russia leaving quick. i think you'll see even troops going in there if he starts using chemical weapons against his own people. about to cross the line. egypt, morsi in trouble. the biggest revolt since mubarak was pushed out of power. "the new york times" also has another fascinating story. john boehner gained strong backing of the house gop. they actually say that the speaker's more powerful today than he has been since he became speaker two years ago. >>
in surplus, washington state in certification plus. -- in surplus. illinois, the dakotas in debt. missouri is your equivalent of in greece, a permanent bailout. the thing is, whereas markets are an easing institutions for -- are amazing institutions for allocating existing goods and services among consumers, they are chronically bad at creating a surplus between deficit -- at creating a balance between deficit and surplus regions. a geographic problem, and intertemporal. remember -- if that comes first, suddenly the money lender who later becomes a banker who later becomes wall street plays a hugely significant role in this process. the banker is the conduct of that -- conduit of that recycling mechanism. when they get an increase in proportion as the result of their mediation of that process. given that, a failure of the banker is the same thing as -- is not the same thing as the failure of a clothes maker. suddenly, there are two things that must have been. -- happen. 1 -- society will demand that banks are not allowed to go to the wall. then bankers are affectively given carte blanche,
on the poor. there's an article in today's -- in "the washington post" on december 19, job boehner's plan b would raise taxes on the poor. really? i mean, is that how you're going to balance the budget? by sticking it to people who already are in vulnerable times? this is wrong. my friends talk about the debt, the deficit, but what they don't talk about is that we have fought two wars, in iraq and afghanistan, and we haven't paid for it. all on our credit card. we send our young men and women into harm's way and we ask them and their families to sacrifice and we do nothing. we just put the bill on our credit card. a few months ago the chairman of the budget committee, mr. ryan, says about $1.3 trillion, i think he's low-balling it, but $1.3 trillion on our debt and nobody over there says a word. they all go after programs like social security and medicare and food stamps. so, mr. speaker, i ask that we defeat the previous question and if we defeat the previous question i will offer an amendment to this rule to make in order an amendment which will allow the house to have a chance to vote on
-dollar may struggle to break higher and definitely to break lieuthrough 1.31. >> adam, you're in washington. how do you view fiscal cliff discussions? >> i was pretty optimistic until about three days ago. my sense was republicans had lost enough ground, they wanted to get a new deal before they got weaker. they admitted that there has to be some revenue. meanwhile the obama team led by secretary geithner are comfortable with at least 2:1 what they would call entitlement cuts. so there was a lot of ground for a deal. unfortunately, i think the threats from some democratic leaders that maybe it's okay to go over the fiscal cliff, i'm worried some actually believe that and that's one thing that scares me. i think there's a deal on the table, get a few years deal, it's only if -- obviously the republican caucus could do something stupid, but owes otherwise my main word is the dems decide they want to play for a long term deal that it all has to be resolved right now and it's worth the risk and i don't think it's worth the risk. >> adam, always good to see you. thank you very much indeed. we mo
in the white house. tonight, on c-span. >> columnist george will spoke recently at washington university in saint louis about the role of religion and politics. it was hosted by the center on religion and politics will hear from former senator john danfor th, just before mr. we will speaks. >> finally, it is my honor to introduce senator john danforth, who will introduce mr. will. the senator is a partner with the law firm. he graduated with honors from princeton university, where he majored in religion. he received a bachelor of divinity degree from yale divinity school and a bachelor of laws degree from yale law school. he practiced law for some years and began his political career in 1968 when he was elected attorney general of missouri in his first place for public office. missouri voters elected him to the u.s. senate in 1976. they reelected him in 1982 and 1988, for a total of 18 years of service. the senator initiated major legislation in international trade, telecommunications, health care, research and development, transportation, and civil rights. he was later appointed special
to head back to washington and jump-start the fiscal cliff negotiations with congress. talks fell apart before christmas. the deadline now is just days away and there is no deal in sight to avoid the tax hikes and spending cuts set to go into effect january 1st. our juan williams is a fox news political analyst and he joins us today and very quickly, juan, merry christmas to you. >> merry christmas, kelly. kelly: this is daunting task facing congress to avert the so-called fiscal cliff that will set into motion more than $600 billion in drastic and draconian allic tax hikes and spending cuts. that will cause a lot of pain for all americans and does congress have enough time to act on this? >> they do. you know it will be very close and it may in fact go beyond the deadline per se although people are thinking at the moment it is possible to get something done by the end of this week. the key here, kelly, is the senate. we have been so focused on the house, speaker boehner, plan. about, plan b falling apart. now speaker boehner is pointing towards the senate and the white house is pointin
it is not an impersonator. it was the senator asking me to come to washington to talk to him about doing a biography of his father. i went to washington and the senator and i had his two dogs had lunch together. on monday his stocks came to the senate because the senate wasn't in session and they could roam and play in the senate. that's a weird site, believe me. we were brought into a tiny little conference room for two dogs, senator and me with the card table and the senator, who was always on the target. they believed he would feel better the center he was, had the most bedraggled sandwich i've ever seen, like a sliver of tuna fish that looked as old as he was end on a piece of bread. i had two pieces of red in potato chips. we talked for three, four hours. but i remember saying over and over again is you don't want me to write this book because i'm an historian and i'm going to find stuff. whatever i find, i'm going to put the book. and who knows, but by the time this book comes out, there might be a kennedy running for office. little did i know that that kennedy's name would be joseph p. kennedy to th
it was not an impersonator, it was the senate asking me to come -- the senator asking me to come to washington to talk to him about doing a biography of his father. i went to washington, and the senator and i and his two dogs had lunch together. on mondays his dogs came to the senate with him because the senate wasn't in session, and they could roam, yeah, play in the senate. it was a weird sight, believe me. [laughter] we were brought into a tiny little conference room. the two dog, the senator and me with a card table in the middle. and the senator, who was always on a diet, they believed that his back, he would feel better the thinner he was, had the most bedraggled sandwich i've ever seen, you know, like a sliver of tuna fish that looked as old as he was. and on a piece of bread. i add two pieces -- i had two pieces of bread and potato chips. [laughter] and we talked for three, four hours. and what i remember saying over and over and over again is you don't want me to write this book. because i'm a historian, and i'm going to find stuff. and whatever i find, i'm going put in the book. and who knows, but
cliff talks. but he stands firm on the debt ceiling. >>> hopes for a deal in washington are pushing european shares near their highest of the year. and sweeten's bank cuts its key interest rate warning of eurozone woes. >>> a federal judge has denied samsung's injunction for a permanent injunction. it's not a total victory for samsung. the judge rejected the company's motion for a new trial based on the thought that the jury foreman was bias on apple. however, ceo jeff immelt says the fiscal cliff in washington has hurt demand in recent months. >>> and meredith whitney says it's time to buy bank. the independent research analyst has upgraded citigroup, bofa and discover financial as muches from hold to buy. ms. whitney told cnbc that the outcome of stress tests by the fed is one of the factors behind the move. she's not the only one to upgrade her move. rbc has hiked its price targets from $49 to $50. earlier we asked you if meredith whitney was trite to upgrade to banks or a little later. bac tops $11 and is up 98% year-to-date. and bahad tweets meredith whitney is now bullish at $
don't rule out total ly washington coming to its senses, but i have to say at the moment that the odds look rather against it. but there is still another option which people are not considering at the moment, and that is that we get a deal before the 12th congress wraps up on the 3rd of january, but after the 1i of january. the bush tax cuts expire and then the house republicans, who are in my view the real source of the problem here, we saw what happened last week when boehner tried to push something through. the house republicans want to cut taxes rather than raising taxes. but frankly, i think this is going to the 113th congress from where we are today the. do you think we're going to feel it on the real economy in the first quarter? are we going to see this slight cautiousness feeding through in how -- >> well, first of all, we are seeing it on the u.s. economy already. there's no question about that. it has happened a distinct impact on corporate america's willingness to invest over the past several months, some say over the past year. that's likely to continue. even if we get a d
of different cross currents from what people were hearing yesterday in washington. market well above 100. >> ended up 85 for the day. >> i guess the demise of john boehner as speaker was greatly exaggerated. did you see this "new york times" piece? more support for boehner now than anytime in his speaker ship. is that's setting up for -- >> but it is social media and twitter allows to you see these things. >> sausage factory into the front of the kitchen. >> exactly. >> geithner didn't use the word marginal rates had to go up, just said rates. >> rates are already going up. there will be a tax increase to people making more than 250 anyway because of the health care law. so the idea that somehow they will get a freebie is just crazy. >> california at 52%, new york and other places -- >> when you add up all the state and local taxes. hawaii is above 50, as well. >> hawaii is worth it, though. >> california is not bad either. >> unless you need to drive somewhere. right? and don't have a helicopter. >> there's a reason the president takes a helicopter anywhere. you can't drive in d.c. sdl
, which stands out to you? >> "mr. smith goes to washington." no matter what your politics are, i cannot imagine anyone watching that film not being somehow moved to have a voice. to be able to put a voice to experience and your point of view. i suppose that gets me every time. >> good choice. >> mine was "it's a wonderful life." it was a snapshot of an imagined america. but maybe in america that was also at its best. to the extent that was a window to the rest of the world, people at their best. >> david? >> my reaction was "saturday night live." [laughter] i love politics, i love the sport of politics. i find it fascinating. between saturday night live in jon stewart, -- and jon stewart,i like satire. >> i am going to cheat and say "12 angry men." >> all of holland came to a stop at 7:00 on monday night. peyton place. >> really? >> thank you very much. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> coming up on c-span -- talks about the judicial system with supreme court justices stephen briar and anthony kennedy. and
of president obama sequestration policy. everyone here in washington is involved in this attack on our national defense capabilities from a financial perspective. the united states of america has limited funding. i would strongly urge us to use the $480 million being spent on the congo, instead being used to help to people in united states of america who are in need of help, or help reduce the deficit that was testified to be the greatest national security threat to the united states of america. it is a matter of priorities. i appreciate the very noble -- i emphasize the word noble -- effort to help people who are in harm's also way in various parts of the world. my colleague from florida mentioned somalia. certainly in vietnam we tried to do the noble things. we're in a different financial reality. in the absence of a national security interest in the congo, i am afraid that sequestration will force us to retract even though we may wish to the contrary. i yield back the remainder of my time. >> a couple of questions. sequestration is not only obama's, but also our responsibility. i believe we
. washington juren live every day at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> the senate runches for legislative business on thursday and the house has a proform asession scheduled that day. the first would extend provisions of the fisa act. the other is a pack abbling for areas affected by hurricane sandy. you can follow live coverage of the senate on c-span2. and house members are on stand by as negotiations continue over the so-called fiscal cliff. >> now a conversation on hollywood's portrayal of politics and policy making in movies and tv shows. among those we'll hear from the crete or the of the show "homeland." this is an hour 20 minutes. >> good evening again. welcome back to the forum. i'm not the one you'll be applauding for. you know we have public events, public forums in our headquarters campus about once a month. and we've had former presidents and foreign ministers and ambassadors and please chiefs. we have never, to my knowledge, had anybody who has ever created, let alone starred in movies or tv series until tonight. and we have michael lynn on the to thank for that. mike sl co-
on vacation. washington lawmakers are on holiday. there's still no deal to avoid the fiscal cliff. the deadline is a week away. hampton pearson is in washington on the stalemate. >> as early as the day after christmas, congress and the white house will have to start to deal with what president obama called the real consequences of going over that fiscal cliff. >> nobody can get 100% of what they want. and this is not simply a contest between parties in terms of who looks good and who doesn't. there are real world consequences to what we do here. >> a short-term deal won't just focus on tax rates. the end of the payroll tax cut and the impact of the hike in the minimum tax on january 1st. over the weekend, we did hear from some republican moderates who say it may in fact be time to make some kind of a move. >> the president's statement is right, no one wants taxes to go up on the middle class. i don't want them to go up on anybody. but i'm not in the majority in the united states senate and he's the president of the united states. >> now the focus shifted to mitch mcconnell. the se
time. you can listen to c-span radio in the washington/baltimore area at 90.1 area, on xm channel 119 or online at c-span radio.org. >> supreme court justice ruth bader ginsburg spoke in the fall at the university of colorado law school. she talked about gender discrimination cases and her own experiences as a woman law school graduate in the early 1960s. this conversation is about an hour, 15 minutes. .. >> we are so grateful to have you here, phil, for all your work. [applause] >> we have several regions here, two of whom are grads of our fine law school, michael and jodi your and irene is here also i believe. and any other regions are here, we thank you for all your support and your spirit. we do very much believe in engaging with the community come and we want to continue to do so in so many ways. i would echo what melissa hart said, and very importantly acknowledge the leadership in terms of the energy she brought to the white center, this lecture was her brainchild. the constitution of the activities were brainchild, and recognizing that under the board of regents, the chase
for him to return to washington. >> reporter: definitely. we expect that he will be heading back to washington, d.c. he was supposed to be here through the new year. i will tell you nothing is official on the schedule that he's definitely going back to d.c., but the sense you get from the white house is that it's more an issue of when and not if. if there is a bill that goes through the senate, the president will have to be there in order to perhaps twist some arms and certainly the optics are important. if we go over the fiscal cliff, suzanne, you've covered the white house. you know the president wouldn't be in hawaii while that happens. >> hopefully you can stay in hawaii, and but you knife to come back with him. we'll see. >> reporter: i think i'd be coming back. >> that's a shame. >>> it's a white christmas for some, and in some places it might be a problem. we're going to check the holiday forecast up next. >>> it's going to be a white and wild christmas in some places. this is stevens pass, washington. a stretch of highway he 2 was impassable because of heavy snow and wind
this? more washington gridlock. no, it's worse -- look, our taxes are about to go up. not the taxes on our dividends though, right? that's a big part of our retirement. oh, no, it's dividends, too. the rate on our dividends would more than double. but we depend on our dividends to help pay our bills. we worked hard to save. well, the president and congress have got to work together to stop this dividend tax hike. before it's too late. [ "the odd couple" theme playing ] humans. even when we cross our "t"s and dot our "i"s, we still run into problems -- mainly other humans. at liberty mutual insurance, we understand. that's why our auto policies come with accident forgiveness if you qualify, where your rates won't go up due to your first accident, and new car replacement, where if you total your new car, we give you the money for a new one. call... to talk to an insurance expert about everything else that comes standard with our base auto policy. [ tires squeal ] and if you get into an accident and use one of our certified repair shops, your repairs are guaranteed for life. call... to
the fiscal deadline could affect the defense budget. >> on tomorrow morning's "washington journal," we continue our look at the so- called fiscal clef and what happens if the budget cuts take place in january. jim doyle the effect on businesses. after that, charles clark looks at domestic program cuts. in more about the issue with the brookings institution. bless your e-mail, phone calls, and tweets. that is live tuesday at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> next, president obama talking about the economy and the need to reach an agreement with congress on the january fiscal deadline. he spoke at a diesel plant outside of detroit. his remarks are about 25 minutes. >> hello, redford! [applause] it is good to be back in michigan. [applause] how is everybody doing today? [applause] now, let me just start off by saying we have something in common -- both our teams lost yesterday. [laughter] i mean, i would like to come here and talk a little smack about the bears, but we didn't quite get it done. but it is wonderful to be back. it is good to see everybody in the great state of michigan. [appl
's rooms, washington, d.c. december 24, 2012. i hereby appoint the honorable mac thornberry to act as speaker pro tempore on this day. signed, john a. boehner, speaker of the house of representatives. the speaker pro tempore: the brare will be offered by our chaplain, father conroy. chaplain conroy: god of light, we give you thanks for giving us another day, as this chamber lies silent, we pray for joy, hope, and love within the homes of the members of the people's house. send us your spirit so that there might be peace on earth, good will among all men and women. all that is done this day be for your great honor and glory. amen. the speaker pro tempore: the chair has examined the journal of the last day's proceedings and announces to the house his approval thereof. pursuant to clause 1 of rule 1, the journal stands approved. the share will lead the house in the pledge of allegiance. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the chair lays before the h
, washington. people want to talk about these ideas. there is a huge appetite for what is war? how do we understand this? i felt this was an example vacation for me as to what the humanities can be and do. i embrace what you say. i worry about the decline in humanity concentrators even in institutions like ours. there are some places where the humanities are expendable when we have to constrained resources. i think we do ourselves a terrible disservice as a country. it does not focus on how to get where it needs to go but knows where it ought to be going. that is a fundamental obligation. >> a great ending to a great panel. thank you. [applause] i'm now going to invite al hunt to come up and introduces panel. in the last session i said gene sperling would be joining us after this discussion. he was in the midst of the fiscal cliff negotiations, so hopefully he will tell us how he is protecting these important investments. >> next, a conversation about spurring investment in the marketplace. this is hosted by the center for american progress. this is 55 minutes. >> that is a really tough
was in washington that month. i think americans always liked churchill. he had been speaking in america for 20 years. was american. guest: his mother was american. he was well known on the lecture circuit and now here he is as prime minister. they were familiar with him. i think he came out of that speech that day knowing he had an ally and americans took a liking to him because they were very wary of churchill that all he wanted were his colonies become. b not liberty or not roosevelt's four freedoms but to recapture everything the japanese had taken from him by using american boys and that americans resented and they were wary of that host: we are about out of time. when did you finish this? guest: early this year? host: early 2012? guest: yes. and about six months of copy editing and final editing with bill phillips. host: out of all the characters in it besides winston chump if you were -- churchill if you were going it write another book who would it be? guest: admiral king comes to mind. and a nod to my dad who was a navy guy. fascinating character. host: will you write another book? guest: y
was african-american as well. i found belle's birth certificate, actually, in washington. she was born in washington, and it tells her birth date and lists 'c' for colored. and the family lived in washington for some years. greener was dean at the howard university law school. he was a very distinguished lawyer and scholar, an active republican. the republicans rewarded him for his service, recruiting blacks for the party, by making him the secretary of the grant monument in new--ulysses s. grant monument in new york, and he was appointed us consul in vladivostok by mckinley and roosevelt. but at some point, around that time, in the late 1890s, the family split up and they were--he was the darkest. the mother was very light-skinned and the children were very light-skinned. so they dropped the r off the end of their name and the mother said her name was genevieve i. greene, widow, although mr. greener was very much alive. and they brought--invented the name da costa, i think, to explain their exotic looks. and belle passed as white for the rest of her life, as far as i know. i don't thi
, and you do, too, because we've seen it repeated because this gridlock in washington, you know, sort of elicits a national eye roll. but we should point out that the issues they're fighting over are the fundamental dividing lines between the two parties. and the reason it has been so hard for them to reach any kind of agreement is because they're arguing about the role of government, bigger or smaller. tax cuts, yes, or more of a social safety net for people? those are the basic foundational issues that define democrats versus republicans. and so while both sides have tried to make noises toward reaching a deal, they fundamentally break down over these divide over ideas. and so these are big issues. they're arguing about right now, suzanne. >> all right. jess, give us an update, if there's any progress from that afternoon meeting. we know they'll at least be sitting in the same place. maybe they'll come up with something. thanks. >>> some u.s. companies are now seeing a big jump in exports to china, of all places. this is part of a growing demand of products made in america. our magg
if they don't do their job in washington. we're obviously concerned about it. if they deal with it, which we think they will. we think that next year should be pretty positive. >> meanwhile big party tonight? >> big party tonight, big party last night. >> that's what the city's all about. >> we'll be opening white plains in may, it will be a little warmer than it was up there last night. it's very exciting to see those hotels get done. 1,000 jobs for the city. >> you see at the bottom of your screen, nat gas inventory. >> listen natural gas prices are extending their gains from yet, after that 4% rally that we saw. we're looking at resistance perhaps around the 4.75 level. we saw a natural gas level that was certainly not what analysts were expectings. 65 billion cubic feet which is much greater than what the consensus was. that was between 64 and 68 million cubic feet. but it's also far greater than what we normally see this time of year. greater than last year's withdrawal. greater than the five-year average and it lets you know that we saw much cooler temperatures last week that certainly
called them stunning and irresponsible, but there may be more cracks in the ranks. "washington post" reports some moderate and conservative republicans are calling on boehner to concede on taxes now while he still has leverage to ask for something in return likely sbiltsment reforms. larry hathaway joins us for more. wlarry, good to see you. geithner says do no harm but they're prepared to go over the cliff. >> i think it's rather disingenuous. the administration feel it is has wind in its sails from the election and is trying to push the mandate on the issue of mar again al tax rates. i think the risks of going off the cliff are quite high. it may not be the base case just yet, but a greater than one this three chance simply because either the leadership in the house and the white house won't find agreement, or the rank and file in the house won't go along with the compromise that its leadership strikes. >> i've been working on the assumption that they're not that stupid or are there tactics if it's only for a few days then we can get something else going? >> i'm not so sure about
a mess washington is, and it's one of the things i really would ask the american public to really consider is, you know, what actually works. your former guest was talking about this. families work. communities work. private businesses work. what doesn't work very well is the fatigue. i don'federal government. i don't know why anybody wants to increase its size. >> greta: one of the things there's so little focus on whether it's republicans or democrats is our inner cities like detroit. they're going to explode, implode on us. they'll ultimately be a huge financial drain on the whole federal budget in some ways. it doesn't seem to me there's enough reaching down to find inspiring good ways to invigorate those communities and get growth in those communities and really fix them. i don't see a lot of attention on that, and i actually see that as both for good moral reasons and also for good economic reasons for everybody else. >> you said the word that is the core part of the solution here, growth. economic growth. again, what is president obama going to do? he's going to punish the
irregulars in washington, which commemorates whitaker chambers and raises a lot of issues. some of you have been there, no. but you pick up all these little things about whitaker chambers, and there is one great story that i like to tell. when he had finished writing witness and he rode it out longhand, he wanted to have it published by the largest or one of the largest american publishers. as a fellow book publisher, he enjoyed the story. called and made a point. and they gave him his time. he came in and introduced in self to the woman sitting at the front desk and said that he was here. and so she called up to his office and she set, whitaker chambers is your. there was a pause. he said get the son of a bitch and a fair. and apparently surf had an intern who worked for him who have really never said anything before. he would help of his files and so on. he sort of stood up and said, mr. cirque, you're making a mistake. he said, whitaker chambers is an eminent man with a very powerful story to tell, and i suspect he has written a book that needs to be published, and you should see him. he
to the council on foreign relations in new york, duke says what's going on in washington could affect their holiday shopping plans. >> the week before the election, only 1/4, 25% of our core customers even knew what fiscal cliff meant. okay? one week after the election, it was up to 75%. now these same customers, 15% of our customers are telling us this discussion about fiscal cliff will affect what they spend on christmas. >> and most americans aren't close to finished with holiday shopping yet. giving retailers a hope for a big boost in the last few weeks beforesom christmas. 58% of those surveyed said they completed half or less of their holiday shopping so far. i've got a little guilt on that front. >>> joining us for more, global ceo of sanrio. welcome. waving to the world there. >> yes. >> happy holiday. >> wearing your brand, as well. >> happy holiday from mr. mann. >> we should point out that mr. men is a key part of your strategy which is changing, is it not? >> exactly. last year we started to did mergers. this is our first acquisition, international acquisition. >> which is
ago, there was a consensus in washington that the earth's atmosphere could be altered. it is a different story. over the next hour, we will discuss opinion, with james hansen and our live audience here at the in san francisco. today, dr. hansen is receiving the 2012 stephen schneider award for outstanding climate science climate one. stephen schneider was a who was involved in the formation of climate one that[applause] sandy. new york? to place it in a modern context, we have to turn to proxy data like coral and ice to piece together the puzzle of how the climate buried in the distant past. it showed it was relatively warm. it was about a thousand years ago. recently that exceeded anything we have seen. it was featured in the summary for policy makers in 2001. when it became an icon, those who find the science inconvenient saw the need to try to discredit this graph. they saw discrediting me as a way to do that. some have been attacked for the work they have done. i was also bill of five. my book tells the story of what it is like to be a scientist and find yourself i
in my apartment here in washington, d.c., proudly i do. i would encourage support of this and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from tennessee yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. waxman: mr. speaker, we have no further requests for speakers on our side of the aisle to support this legislation. i know almost all democrats that i've talked to think it's a good bill. i've urged the others to join with them in supporting it. i think it's a worthwhile piece of legislation. it's a small step but it's a step in the right direction and it will clarify some issues that still need to be clarified. so let's get this done and in pursuit of that objective, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from kentucky is recognized. mr. whitfield: i also want to urge everybody to support h.r. 6582, the small, modest energy efficiency bill, that will save some jobs. certainly want to thank the members of the senate,
as washington welcomes a high-level chinese delegation led by the vice premier. his team is in the u.s. to talk trade and economy. he's expected to meet with u.s. treasury secretary tim geithner tomorrow. wang is the first official from the new leadership team to visit with the u.s. for more on the impact and implications of this, let's speak with frank ching, adjunct associate professor at the chinese university of hong kong. frank, hi. the first news that we're getting out of this appears to be more import duties s. this going to be the theme of u.s./china relations, or do you expect these meetings to be more of a thaw? >> well, i think that these are the first meetings since the new leadership in china was installed. and since president obama saw -- well, won second term. i think both sides want to make use of this occasion to improve their relationship. so this joint annual meeting is a platform, and i think that they will probably be able to achieve some progress on issues of concern to both sides. but i don't see any sweeping changes. >> what's interesting, frank, and you point this out,
, a ticking clock in washington. tend of the year fast approaching. still no deal to avert the fiscal cliff.
much the way george washington brushed aside his own impotence of ordnance in the revolution your while at key moments he put his foot down and essentially told the brits to stuff it. that didn't stop field marshal bernard montgomery from becoming a thorn in the sight of all american commanders in europe for the duration of the war. but ike, omar bradley, george patton all managed to work around to minimize the negative impacts of the war effort. so when the war ends we are expected to supply wealth and prosperity to all. we do to the death of our ability. and yet this brings with it this ironing that by supplying wealth and protection you are eroding the very disciplines that are necessary to maintain and perpetuate prosperity for yourself and prosperity and freedom for others. that would be the challenge for the next 75 years and the topic of volume two. how to provide a canopy of liberty and perpetuate american exceptionalism while allowing in just enough rain of difficulty and disappointment to remind americans and the world that the era in which we've all been blessed was no golden
who had infur yatesed and embarrassed him when he was on a visit to washington on this action of taking this island, in canada. and winston was really furious. and apparently launch mood this great tirade. and monet was meant to sort of help with the translation of that, ease the passage of all this. and at the end of this tirade apparently de gaulle who was in full uniform simply rose and put on his hat and saluted, and left the room. and churchill who had been absolutely infuriate add cording to monet slided back into his chair an simply said magnificent. >> rose: wait, magnificent in applause. >> applause. >> de gaulles theatre. >> the sense of theatre, in response to churchill's tirade was for him to walk out. >> rose: he so was appreciative of defall. >> there are two people, you know, who are famously opposed not get on and they had flaming rowe but there was a real sense of mutual respect between them because these were two men who hundreds of men stuck up for thane own. >> insomitiable spirit despice-- despite of the odds. >> indomitiable but patriotic. they respected
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